Rev Marie-Elsa Roche Bragg, author, priest, therapist and Duty Chaplain of Westminster Abbey

We can’t understand nature, or “creation” as it should more properly be called, without understanding Invisible Magic Stuff. And that is how we save the rain-forests.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1CQkBZDNAR5NnptOK3YzEYADbXMr1Z_lE/view?usp=sharing

4 thoughts on “Rev Marie-Elsa Roche Bragg, author, priest, therapist and Duty Chaplain of Westminster Abbey

    1. Hope you had a good, relaxing and waffle-free** time.

      ” nature, or “creation” as it should more properly be called ” — shame the all wise creator didn’t think about putting in feedback and control loops to help maintain nature — though rampant overpopulation (encouraged by many religions) and environmental destruction, being bad things, are down to humanity’s “sin” I suppose.

      **apart from Belgian waffles 🙂

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  1. Welcome back, Rev Dr Dr. Bet you wish you’d stayed away a bit longer.

    It’s not necessary to think of the natural world as “sacred” to see the point of preserving it. In fact it gets in the way: if you believe that the IMF “created” everything, you also tend to believe that everything must be special to it, and that “in the end” it will do something to preserve its creation. Once you understand instead that all life has evolved through natural selection to occupy particular environmental niches, you come to realise how contingent and vulnerable (or not) it really is.

    No doubt Melvyn’s daughter is sincere in her concern for the indigenous Amazonian peoples. Maybe her wide reading will some day lead her to an account of the damage done to those peoples, and their cultures, by the interfering missionaries belonging to her faith.

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    1. “If our understanding of nature does not include the sacred we may never hear what nature has to tell us.”
      I would say, as Stephen does here, that including the sacred makes the situation more dangerous. Thinking that god will make everything better, what could be described as a few market version of theology, is hopelessly naïve.
      Yes, “believing we have a full understanding is arrogant,” but having a warped misunderstanding is far more dangerous.

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