Pádraig Ó Tuama, poet, theologian and mediator

We’re nearing the end of the Great British Pea Harvest. And what a fantastic week it has been. Everybody’s talking about it.

They have harvests in Ireland too. There people help each other out. This is because of Jesus, who invented helping each other out at harvest time. Before Jesus invented helping each other out at harvest time, there were no communities of farmers and farmers were all very selfish and hated one another.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1V3t6wS4WSy50zDAYI83InW_HRp8maie8/view?usp=sharing

2 thoughts on “Pádraig Ó Tuama, poet, theologian and mediator

  1. I harvested a good crop of peas at my allotment on Friday, the first of the year. At the allotments people share seedlings that they have too many of in the spring and produce that they have too much of in the autumn. Or rhubarb at the moment.
    Everyone gets their manure from the local stables owner in exchange for a bottle of wine as it helps him get rid of it.
    We share tips on planting and keeping pests away.
    In 2020 we all helped look after the plots of those who couldn’t come out because of Covid restrictions.
    We are like farmers everywhere and none of us needs a supernatural overseer to help us or to tell us when someone else needs help. We are human and can recognise that for ourselves.

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  2. Commercially-grown peas are picked and processed using big machines. There’s not too much need for farmers to help each other out. Carrots or cabbages or fruit are another matter: they need a lot of hard labour. So do their farmers help each other out? No, they rely on cheap labour from Eastern Europe. So do many of those in Pádraig Ó Tuama’s bucolic Irish paradise, come to that.

    You can tell a lot about someone from the version of Jesus they choose to present. Today we had the peasant’s friend, the anti-establishment insurgent: a sort of Judaean Che Guevara. All the versions have one thing in common: they are products of the imagination, either that of their original authors, or that of their later interpreters. Fortunately, there are at least five versions in the BBoMS alone (the four Gospels plus Paul), so there is plenty of material to draw on.

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