Mona Siddiqui, professor of Islamic studies, New College, University of Edinburgh

The report into the Irish Mother and Baby Homes scandal has documented shocking levels of neglect and abuse. Religion continues to shame those that it disproves of.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/16wP8SYRFO2as–6OSDKBJjqBirFE90PP/view?usp=sharing

10 thoughts on “Mona Siddiqui, professor of Islamic studies, New College, University of Edinburgh

  1. Unusual for a TftD to negatively reference another religion, even if also referring to similar shortcomings in their own. The Catholic bunch have passed up on two TftD opportunities to address the herd of elephants in their own room and instead chose to witter on about ‘safe’ topics where they had no particular expertise. Sad that these blinkered, cowardly hypocrites don’t have the moral fibre to ‘own’ their powerful hegemony’s shortcomings.

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  2. Working now.
    Absolutely damning that a non- Christian,never mind a non- Catholic, was the one to bring this up on the slot. Beattie could have done so a couple of days ago. And we know , both from her reference to Islam here, and her general approach , that Mona wasn’t points scoring. For once I won’t be complaining that this TftD had little to distinguish it from a secular viewpoint.

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  3. At least Mona was willing to take on our challenge to discuss the topic but what I still don’t understand from a religious perspective is, if your religion makes you more judgmental and willing to shame others or makes you ashamed of things that shouldn’t be shameful in a human society then why stick with it? Surely this is one of the challenges that a believer should set themselves the task of studying and understanding.

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    1. Agreed. It is a feature of pretty well all religions that they treat women as, at best, second-class individuals, if not as disposable chattels, and this is because they were all made up by men. This seems obvious if you can bring yourself to stand outside religion for a moment; but if you were immersed in your faith before you could think for yourself it does become a bit of a challenge.

      Still, kudos to Mona for being prepared to discuss the elephant in the room. I can’t see any of the RCC stooges who appear on TftD being as forthright.

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    2. “…if your religion makes you more judgemental and willing to shame others or makes you ashamed of things that shouldn’t be shameful in a human society then why stick with it?…”

      This sparked an interesting, if somewhat tangential, thought:

      Do religions tend to make people judgemental? (as a way of enforcing group membership and excluding ‘others’) OR
      Do judgemental people tend to become religious? (as a way of finding like minded people)

      Or, as I suspect, a bit of both. Religions and politicians like to proclaim inclusivity but secretly they love and thrive on bigotry.

      As people have said, it was good to have the issue addressed. Perhaps it’s too much to ask for responses from other presenters tomorrow and next week.

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  4. Well done, Mona, for tackling this issue which hasn’t reached the top of any other contributor’s list of ‘important topics worthy of my attention’.
    As above, it’s awkward to take a religious approach to the scandal of a “stifling, oppressive and brutally misogynistic culture” without damning your own lot because they’ve all been guilty of devaluing women & children.
    Maybe this was Mona’s way of breaking the ice so that future TFTDers are free to talk about this sorry tale, the IICSA & whatever horrors to be uncovered in the future.

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