Magnificently Revd Nicholas Baines, Bishop of Leeds, West Yorkshire, the Dales and any other bits that can’t afford their own bishop any more

Game of Thrones, a fictional tv series that I’ve never seen, is exactly like Jesus.

Listen/Read

9 thoughts on “Magnificently Revd Nicholas Baines, Bishop of Leeds, West Yorkshire, the Dales and any other bits that can’t afford their own bishop any more

  1. A derivative plot, unconvincing characters, hard-to-believe magic tricks, cliche’d dialogue, an easily foreseeable ending…yup, the Gospels are not a patch on Game of Thrones.

    Still, I suppose this was as close as a CofE Bishop dares to come to admitting that the whole thing is nothing more than a story. Although after having to plough through it from end to end every year for the past 2000, you’d think the novelty would have worn off by now.

    Like

  2. “The bible has all the elements of Game Of Thrones; drama, intrigue, shocks, twists, war, violence, a character coming back from the dead after being brutally executed, fantastical supernatural elements and characters…except the bible is obviously not fiction, it’s definite, absolute, literal, historical fact. Yet the interweb is awash with people enthusiastically discussing and debating Game Of Thrones and not the bible. Not that I’m bitter or anything, but the bible is infinitely superior, and, unlike me, these people just don’t know that they’re missing.”

    Like

  3. It is a bizarre thing that the story of Jesus is portrayed as some kind of deep psychological torment for the reader. It is absolutely anything but. I guess that it is so shallow that the people who want to sound serious when talking about it have to add in some extra bits.

    One example is the crucifixion. I have never heard any apologist explain whether Jesus’s (aka God) omniscience was suspended for his time on Earth. If not, the for certain the story of the two thieves is vastly more horrific than that of I’ll-be-back T-800Jesus. I mean, Max Mosely would pay handsomely for something similar.

    Like

    1. Steve, part of the problem is that the different Gospels talk about different Jesuses. For Mark, he is an ordinary bloke who is baptised into becoming the Messiah, and at times he behaves like a human being (eg “My God, My God, why have you forsaken me?”) Jolly good at conjuring tricks, though.

      For Matthew and Luke, he was begotten by God but also had a thoroughly human pedigree: they both trace him through Joseph all the way back to Adam, although why this should matter if his true father was the IMF I have never understood. I guess it is to emphasise that he was initially sent to the Israelites, who rejected him even though he was one of them.

      Only in John is Jesus the pre-existing Son of God, and he behaves like a god throughout; indeed, he seems to know exactly what is happening and why. So, for John, his omniscience clearly wasn’t suspended. For the others, he seems not to have been pre-existing, and therefore not omniscient.

      But I’m only a sceptical atheist. What do I know?

      Like

      1. I’ve asked the internet, and the answer seems to be YES. Jesus was omniscient, and he specifically knew that he would be resurrected. Of course he did, because Jesus is ACE. But this doesn’t lessen his sacrifice, because, you know, it didn’t. Crucifixion is really bad, so just like shut up and everything. So that point has now been completely dealt with.

        Like

  4. If you want really to ruin a story with an unexpected and disconcerting ending, then after you’ve killed off the central character – just make him come alive again. What Christians regard as a moment of glory and triumph is to me anti-climax, a dramatic narrative disaster. And I have never seen the point of Jesus coming back alive again; the story fizzles out after that, and (in reality) is followed by 2000 years of wars and conquest, bloodshed, colonialism, slavery, and also magnificent art, architecture, science, music, literature and general everyday life that bears absolutely no relation to the dismal story of Jesus. What was the point?

    Like

  5. If you want really to ruin a story with an unexpected and disconcerting ending, then after you’ve killed off the central character – just make him come alive again. What Christians regard as a moment of glory and triumph is to me anti-climax, a dramatic narrative disaster. And I have never seen the point of Jesus coming back alive again; the story fizzles out after that, and (in reality) is followed by 2000 years of wars and conquest, bloodshed, colonialism, slavery, and also magnificent art, architecture, science, music, literature and general everyday life that bears absolutely no relation to the dismal story of Jesus. So what was the point?

    Like

  6. “Forcing them to choose between their expectations and their experienced reality” – isn’t this what we all have to do in real life? But if you are religious you always end up staying with your expectations rather than reality.
    Any rational person would accept that homosexuality is a real thing (experienced reality) but a religious expectation is that god is perfect and therefore homosexuality can’t exist because a perfect god wouldn’t deliberately allow imperfection. So let’s protest outside schools against experienced reality and in favour of our very silly expectations. Discussing that very pertinent topic might have been more apt than trying to sound snobbish about never watching GoT.

    Like

  7. At the point of his death [spoilers!] in Star Wars, Obi-Wan Kenobi promised to “become more powerful than you can possibly imagine” – this is a famous quotation but I don’t know why he said it because he didn’t seem to do anything after that. Darth Vader was killed [spoilers!] by & after betraying his Emperor.
    This & other inconsistencies don’t seem to have dented the popularity of the franchise so a coherent story isn’t necessary to maintain popularity.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s