Jasvir Singh, Chair of the City Sikhs Network, Co-chair of Faiths Forum 4 London

Tomorrow is the anniversary of the Jallianwala Bagh massacre, when British troops shot hundreds of innocent civilians dead to maintain the glory of the British Empire.

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9 thoughts on “Jasvir Singh, Chair of the City Sikhs Network, Co-chair of Faiths Forum 4 London

  1. The King was George V and he had god on his side and a shed load full of honours so everything done by the British must have been right.

    George V, by the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, King, Defender of the Faith, Emperor of India” until the Royal and Parliamentary Titles Act 1927, when it changed to “George V, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, Ireland and the British Dominions beyond the Seas, King, Defender of the Faith, Emperor of India”

    Titles, styles, honours and arms
    Titles and styles
    Royal Highness Prince George of Wales
    His Royal Highness The Duke of York
    His Royal Highness The Duke of Cornwall and York
    His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales
    His Majesty The King

    British honours
    KG: Knight of the Garter, 4 August 1884[137]
    KT: Knight of the Thistle, 5 July 1893[137]
    KP: Knight of St Patrick, 20 August 1897[137]
    GCSI: Knight Grand Commander of the Star of India, 28 September 1905[137]
    GCMG: Knight Grand Cross of St Michael and St George, 9 March 1901[137][138]
    GCIE: Knight Grand Commander of the Indian Empire, 28 September 1905[137]
    GCVO: Knight Grand Cross of the Royal Victorian Order, 30 June 1897[137]
    ISO: Imperial Service Order, 31 March 1903[137]
    Royal Victorian Chain, 1902[137]
    PC: Privy Counsellor, 18 July 1894[137]
    Privy Counsellor (Ireland), 20 August 1897[137]
    Queen Victoria Golden Jubilee Medal, with 1897 bar[139]
    After his accession to the throne in 1910, George became sovereign of all the orders awarded by the British Empire and (later) Commonwealth, including those awarded him prior to his accession.

    Military appointments
    September 1877: Cadet, HMS Britannia[140]
    8 January 1880: Midshipman, HMS Bacchante and the corvette HMS Canada[137]
    3 June 1884: Sub-Lieutenant, Royal Navy[137]
    8 October 1885: Lieutenant, HMS Thunderer; HMS Dreadnought; HMS Alexandra; HMS Northumberland[137]
    21 June 1887: Personal Aide-de-Camp to the Queen[141]
    July 1889 I/C HMS Torpedo Boat 79[142]
    By May 1890 I/C the gunboat HMS Thrush[143]
    24 August 1891: Commander, I/C HMS Melampus[137]
    2 January 1893: Captain, Royal Navy[137]
    1 January 1901: Rear-Admiral, Royal Navy[137][144]
    25 February 1901: Personal Naval Aide-de-Camp to the King[145]
    26 June 1903: Vice-Admiral, Royal Navy[137]
    1 March 1907: Admiral, Royal Navy[137][146]
    1910: Admiral of the Fleet, Royal Navy[137]
    1910: Field Marshal, British Army[146]
    1919: Chief of the Royal Air Force (title not rank)[147]
    1 January 1901: Colonel-in-Chief of the Royal Marine Forces[148]
    29 November 1901: Honorary Colonel of the 4th County of London Yeomanry Regiment (King’s Colonials)[149]
    21 December 1901: Colonel-in-Chief of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers[150]

    Foreign honours
    Knight of the Order of the Elephant (Denmark), 11 October 1885[137]
    Order of the Dannebrog (Denmark),[139] Grand Commander 9 May 1914
    Knight of the Order of the Seraphim (Sweden), 14 June 1905[137]
    Collar of the Order of Charles III (Spain), 1901/1902[151][152]
    Knight of the Order of the Golden Fleece (Spain)[137]
    Knight of the Order of Saint Hubert (Bavaria)[153]
    Knight of the Order of the Most Holy Annunciation (Italy)[137]
    Grand Commander of the House Order of Hohenzollern (Prussia)[153]
    Grand Cross of the House Order of the Wendish Crown (Mecklenburg)[153]
    Member 1st Class with Brilliants of the Order of Osmanieh (Ottoman Empire),[137]
    Knight of the Order of St Andrew (Russian Empire)[137]
    Knight of the Order of the Black Eagle (Prussia)[137][153]
    Grand Cross of the Saxe-Ernestine House Order (Saxon duchies)[139][153]
    Knight of the Order of the Rue Crown (Saxony), October 1902[137][153][154]
    Grand Cross of the Order of the Red Eagle (Prussia),[153]
    Grand Cross of the Order of the White Falcon (Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach)[153]
    Grand Cross of the Order of the Redeemer (Greece)[139]
    King Christian IX Jubilee Medal (Denmark)[139]
    King Christian IX and Queen Louise of Denmark Golden Wedding Commemorative Medal (Denmark)[139]
    Cross of Liberty, 1st class (Estonia), 17 June 1925[155]
    Grand Cross of the Order of the Colonial Empire (Portugal), 19 February 1934[156]
    Honorary foreign military appointments
    1 February 1901: À la suite of the Imperial German Navy[157]
    26 January 1902: Colonel-in-Chief of the Rhenish Cuirassier Regiment “Count Geßler” No. 8 (Prussia)[158]
    24 May 1910: Admiral of the Royal Danish Navy[159]
    Honorary Colonel of the Infantry Regiment “Zamora” No. 8 (Spain)[160][161]
    Honorary degrees and offices
    8 June 1893: Royal Fellow of the Royal Society,[137] installed 6 February 1902[162]
    1899: Doctor of Laws (LLD), University of the Cape of Good Hope[163]
    1901: Doctor of Laws (LLD), University of Sydney[164]
    1901: Doctor of Laws (LLD), University of Toronto[165]
    1901: Doctor of Civil Law (DCL), Queen’s University, Ontario[166]
    1902: Doctor of Laws (LLD), University of Wales[167]
    1901: Chancellor of the University of Cape Town[168]
    1901–1912: Chancellor of the University of the Cape of Good Hope[163]
    1902–1910: Chancellor of the University of Wales[167]

    So there:-

    But here is the thing. No amount of wars, conquests, coercion, cyber attacks, sabre rattling, gunboat diplomacy, fighting, military force, neuclear threats, assasinations, atrocities, acts of terrorism, interference in the politics of other countries will secure global peace. The only thing that will work is secular humanism where every one cares for and respects every one else and the planet on which we live. Take note all theologians and apologists. Your dogmas are poison. Keep religious out of the public square but allow freedom of religion for all and freedom from religion for all.

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  2. I have some sympathy for those for whom the Golden Temple ‘massacre’ still casts a shadow over their family history or faith. Mr Singh is still puzzled as to why it occurred at all, but there is some pretty detailed research explaining how it fitted into the context of that period’s politics and religious dynamics – and the incident has been viewed from all sides. A three minute slot is not long enough to rehearse all the whys and wherefores of this now notorious incident, and I can’t work out how Singh’s piece constituted a TFTD on the lines of the BBC’s clearly stated criteria.

    I read to the end, Terry, and can see the point you were making (also agree with your last para.) Despite the Great War it was still a time of potentates, and there were Indian Maharaja’s with impressively long titles, who also had a contemptuous disregard for the lives of the common people. It’s not enough to say ‘there was wrong on both sides,’ but I only mention this because I couldn’t really see where the speaker was going with this one.

    Plus…. the Anniversary isn’t till tomorrow, so Singh has effectively robbed Saturday’s contributor of one option!

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  3. Listening to Jasvir Singh relate the events of this atrocity could only elicit horror and sympathy; however, as Liverpudlian states, yet again it was a TftD that fell bewilderingly short of its purported brief.

    It’s almost as if the TftD speakers realise that discussing angels and pinheads doesn’t hold any traction with a lay audience any longer.

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  4. Yes, once again we have a TftD that offered exactly no faith-based insight into a current issue in the news; indeed, it offered no faith-based insight into the Golden Temple massacre either. It is impossible to do justice (in all senses of the word) to this historical event in the time available, as Liverpudlian points out. The most eloquent and incisive of modern historians would almost certainly fail to do so, so it’s no surprise that Jasvir Singh also failed.

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  5. “It’s almost as if the TftD speakers realise that discussing angels and pinheads doesn’t hold any traction with a lay audience any longer.”

    I really would be interested to hear a definitive answer to that one, though!

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  6. @Helen: too right, there seems to have been total radio silence by the religious on the incredible images of the black hole. Strange that their IMF doesn’t seem to have let them into the picture (let alone the rest of us) in advance. As AndyM said the other day:

    “What’s the betting we get a TftD soon, telling us the whole thing was due to our God-given curiosity , nourished by the sense of wonder religion engenders?”

    I guess they’re still working on the script.

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